COMDTINSTR201305.30 CHAIN of COMMAND

Here you can find our group's public policies concerning various issues.

Moderator: SLCG COS



Revision Date: 21 MAY 2013

To: All SLCG Commands and Members

Subj: SL Coast Guard Chain of Command and Methods of Communication within the Group.

In order to establish and maintain proper and efficient communications within the group the following policy is hereby placed in effect. All other documentation in referencing the chain of command is considered void with the publication of this document and policy.

SLCG GROUP CHAIN OF COMMAND (COC)

SLCG Member: This is the person with no leadership responsibilities. (Boat or Aircraft Crew). Reports directly to the Coxswain while on a vessel or aircraft otherwise to the Station Commanding Officer.

SLCG Coxswain: This is the boat commander who is in charge of all crew and passengers while they on the vessel the coxswain commands. This person is also responsible for the safety and welfare of those onboard his vessel. Reports directly to the Station Commanding Officer.

SLCG Aircraft Commander: This is the aircraft commander who is in charge of all crew and passengers while they are on the aircraft the pilot commands. This person is also responsible for the safety and welfare of those onboard his aircraft. Reports directly to the Station Commanding Officer.

Station Command Master Chief Petty Officer: This is a senior ranked enlisted member and serves as the Commanding officers advisor in regards to enlisted affairs. This person is not considered to be part of the chain of command but may serve as a bridge between the enlisted member and the station Commander. Enlisted members should seek the counsel of the units CMCPO when needed. A wise Station Commander would do well to listen to his/her CMCPO so they can keep a finger on the pulse of his/her station. Reports directly to the Station Commanding Officer.

Station Executive Officer: This is the 2nd in command of a unit and handles the day to day and administrative affairs of the units. This officer is also considered the “Chief of Staff” for that station should the station be large enough to have various staff members assigned. The Executive officer (XO) is only considered to be in command during such times as the Commanding Officer is absent on leave or there is no Commanding Officer assigned in which case the executive officer would be considered the “Acting Commanding Officer”. The Executive officer is not normally considered to be part of the chain of command. Reports directly to the Station Commanding Officer or District Commanding Officer should the Station Commanding Officer not be onboard. (Offline does not mean on leave).

Station Commanding Officer: This person is in overall charge of all members and equipment assigned to his her unit. The Commanding officer is also charged with the safety and welfare and success of all personnel assigned to his/her unit. The Station Commanding Officer may institute such policies and directives as needed on the absence of District/Area/Group polices that cover a specific topic. Reports directly to the District Commanding Officer.

District Commanding Officer: This person’s job is to ensure the success of the stations within his/her district. Also to ensure that all communications from higher command are followed and if required, seek clarification of them. The District Commanding Officer may institute such policies and directives as needed on the absence of Area/Group polices that cover a specific topic. And member may request mast to the this level only after talking with his/her Station Commanding officer or directly should the Station Commanding Officer be the reason for the request mast. Reports directly to the Area Commanding Officer.

Area Commanding Officer: This person’s job is to ensure the success of all stations and districts within his/her area. Also to ensure that all communications from higher command are followed and if required, seek clarification of them. The Area Commanding Officer may institute such policies and directives as needed on the absence of group polices that cover a specific topic. Any member may request mast to the this level only after talking with his/her Station Commanding officer, District Commanding Officer or directly should the Station/District Commanding Officer be the reason for the request mast. Reports directly to the SLCG Commandant.

Group Headquarters Staff: All HQ staff members are charged with the support of the Commandant by suggesting policy and directives that may enhance and improve the operations of the group as a whole. HQ staff members also support the subordinate commands by ensuring all administrative needs are fulfilled in a timely fashion. HQ staff members have no command authority nor are considered part of the chain of command. Any orders, polices or directives issued by HQ staff members are by the direction of the Commandant and should be consider coming directly from the Commandant. Should clarification be required or questions asked, they should be addressed via the proper chain of command.

SLCG Deputy Commandant: This person has the same basic duties as a station executive officer in that they are the eyes and ears of the commandant and are in charge of the group should the commandant be on leave. (Offline does not mean on leave).

SLCG Commandant: This person has overall command authority for the entire group, its members and equipment. The Commandant guides the group in such direction as his/she sees as being in the best interest of the group overall. Any member may request mast to the commandant via the chain of command unless the Station, District and Area Commanding Officers are the subject of the request mast.

BASIC DEFENITION: Chain of Command
In the SLCG we use billets vs. rank in use of the chain of command. The real world militaries use ranks because it is highly unlikely that an “Enlisted” member would be in command of a officer. Note the keyword “Unlikely” does not mean “Impossible”. In the real world a basic member would be of a lower enlisted rank such as Seaman (E-1, E-2 or E-3), Petty Officer (E-4, E-5, E-6), Chief Petty Officer (E-7, E-8, E-9) Thus for an example an Petty officer has authority over a Seaman and a Chief Petty officer has authority over a Petty Officer. As another example, a work detail consisting of 4 enlisted members is formed to perform a task. Two of the members are E-3’s, one is a E-4 and one is an E-5. In this case the E-5 would be in charge of that “Work Detail”.

This is a “General” Description Only. The purpose of a “Chain of Command” (COC) is to ensure clear communications between all levels of a group or unit. And it also will ensure that all unit commanders are aware of what is occurring within his/her area of responsibility.

In a military context, the chain of command is the line of authority and responsibility along which orders are passed within a military unit and between different units. Orders are transmitted down the chain of command, from a higher-ranked soldier, such as a commissioned officer, to lower-ranked personnel who either execute the order personally or transmit it down the chain as appropriate, until it is received by those expected to execute it.
In general, military personnel give orders only to those directly below them in the chain of command and receive orders only from those directly above them. A service member who has difficulty executing a duty or order and appeals for relief directly to an officer above his immediate commander in the chain of command is likely to be disciplined for not observing the chain of command. Similarly, an officer is usually expected to give orders only to his or her direct subordinate, even if it is just to pass an order down to another service member lower in the chain of command than said subordinate.

The concept of chain of command also implies that higher rank alone does not entitle a higher-ranking service member to give commands to anyone of lower rank. For example, an officer of unit "A" does not directly command lower-ranking members of unit "B", and is generally expected to approach an officer of unit "B" if he requires action by members of that unit. The chain of command means that individual members take orders from only one superior and only give orders to a defined group of people immediately below them.

If an officer of unit "A" does give orders directly to a lower-ranked member of unit "B", it would be considered highly unusual (a faux pas, or extraordinary circumstances, such as a lack of time or inability to confer with the officer in command of unit "B") as officer "A" would be seen as subverting the authority of the officer of unit "B". Depending on the situation or the standard procedure of the military organization, the lower-ranked member being ordered may choose to carry out the order anyway, or advise that it has to be cleared with his or her own chain of command first, which in this example would be with officer "B". Refusal to carry out an order is almost always considered insubordination, the only exception usually allowed is if the order itself is illegal (i.e., the person carrying out the order would be committing an illegal act).

In addition, within combat units, line officers are in the chain of command, but officers in specialist fields (such as medical, dental, legal, supply, and chaplain) are not, except within their own specialty. For example, a medical officer in an infantry battalion would be responsible for the combat medics in that unit but would not be eligible to command the battalion or any of its subordinate units.

The term is also used in a civilian management context describing comparable hierarchical structures of authority.

BASIC DEFENITION: Request Mast
Every member right to be heard. At every step up the chain of command any member may request to see the next person in authority all the way to the Commandant of the SL Coast Guard. When a request mast is asked for the member does not have to explain why, but he or she must make the request at every step up the ladder. If a member requests mast to the Commandant, he or she had better have a good reason. Request Mast includes both the right of the member to personally talk to the commander, normally in person, and the requirement that the commander consider the matter and personally respond to the member requesting mast.

Request Mast provides a member the opportunity to communicate not only with his or her immediate commanding officer, but also with any superior commander in the chain of command up to and including the Commandant. Request Mast also provides commanders with firsthand knowledge of the morale and general welfare of the command.

All members should first make every effort to address the offending behavior directly with the party responsible, verbally or in writing. You can also discuss the matter with your immediate commander and request assistance. If you are unable to resolve the issue informally, you have the right to Request Mast.

A commanding officer may deny a Request Mast application if there is another specific avenue of redress available to the member. The commanding officer should explain to the member why he/she denied the Request Mast application and, if appropriate, explain the procedure the member should follow to resolve the issue. The commanding officer may also require the member to go through the Chain of Command prior to approving Mast.

Generally, a member can speak to the Commanding Officer about any subject; however, the member cannot use request mast for the following reasons:

Request Mast should not be used as a means of attacking the proceedings, punishment, or findings and sentence resulting from a disciplinary action.

Request Mast may not be used to harass, avoid duty, or intentionally interfere with the commander's ability to carry out the functions and mission of the command.

Request Mast cannot be used if the member is being processed for involuntary separation or if the subject of an active complaint.
vladimirwroth
 
Posts: 35
Joined: 08 Aug 2014, 20:44


Return to Public Statements of Policy

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest